Kansas at Old National Centre 11/18/18 - Point of Know Return Tour

Kansas “Point of Know Return” 40th Anniversary Tour at Old National Centre 11/11/18

After 40 years and over 6 million copies, Kansas’ “Point of Know Return” album remains an icon of progressive rock. To see and hear it performed live, in its entirety, is an amazing experience, and one which I wholeheartedly recommend! I was privileged to be part of the sold-out crowd when Kansas came to the Murat Theatre at Old National Centre in Indianapolis November 11. I wondered if I’d recognize all the songs, how they’d sound after all these years, and if I’d like the new Kansas tunes. The answers to those questions were YES, ABSOLUTELY AMAZING, and YES!

Kansas began their 2+ hour set with several acoustic songs, including “Refugee,” from their latest album, “The Prelude Implicit,” and an emotional version of “People of the South Wind,.” They then transitioned to a full electric set, playing “Dust in the Wind,” as well as deep cuts off their various albums, and “Summer” from “The Prelude Implicit.” They then ripped through the entire “Point of Know Return” album – and it was incredible. To be honest, I had kind of forgotten how much I loved this album. I must’ve listened to it dozens of times, because I remembered all the melodies, cool riffs, key changes, and chord progressions. But I had forgotten how revolutionary, intricate - and technically difficult - these songs were. As leaders of the progressive rock movement, Kansas the set the bar tremendously high, and few, if any, bands have surpassed them.

But Kansas’ music isn’t just for audiophiles. Sure, those who understand the complexity and depth of Kansas’ performance will get more out of it, but honestly, there were a whole bunch of people in the audience who were there just to hear the hits they listened to on the radio, turntable, and/or 8-track back in the 70s, and I’m 100% sure they had a blast, too.

As for me, I loved every single song. And although I was jamming along with everyone else to “Portrait (He Knew)”, “Spider,” and “Point of Know Return,” I gained new appreciation for “Lightning’s Hand” and “The Tempest” after watching them being performed live. Fingers, bows, and drumsticks were flying, and the energy levels were out the roof for those songs, both of which completely engaged the crowd. Which reminds me: props to the lighting maestros, who did a brilliant job (no pun intended) of spotlighting each artist at just the right time throughout the whole show.

Kansas closed out the set with “Hopelessly Human,” and even though they left the darkened stage, there was no question they were returning for an encore, because one key song had yet to be performed: “Carry On My Wayward Son.” The entire crowd went nuts for this one, myself included. To say this song is iconic is cliché, but dammit, it’s true. The poignant lyrics, the harmonies, the heavy bass and guitar, and of course that hook in the chorus, come together in a masterpiece that generations know, love, and sing along to – at the top of their lungs. Although I’m sure it would’ve sounded a whole lot better if it wasn’t sung out of key by several thousand people, but it was still a beautiful thing.

Brent James and the Vintage Youth at the Deluxe at Old National Centre 10/19/18

See my review for Brent James and the Vintage Youth right below the Candlebox Gallery.

Candlebox at the Deluxe at Old National Centre 10/19/18

See my review below this gallery


Live Review – Candlebox with Brent James and the Vintage Youth at Old National Centre, 10 19 18

By Laura Fox for The Front Row Report

After a two-year absence, Seattle-based Candlebox returned to Indianapolis Friday night, playing to a packed crowd at the Deluxe at Old National Centre. The five-piece band, who describe themselves as “Face melting kinda metal but not really grunge yet close and VERY Blues based,” are undoubtedly icons of the 1990s Seattle music scene, and I was really stoked about seeing them again.

I was also excited to hear Brent James and the Vintage Youth. Although I knew the quartet from Cincinnati was more Muscle Shoals than Seattle Grunge, I was a little surprised when half the band appeared on stage barefoot. It started to make sense as they started jamming on their first song, “Fine Young Man,” which could’ve been on a Molly Hatchet album back in the day. Skillfully blending blues, rock and rockabilly, frontman Brent James, accompanied by Ricky Veeneman on guitar, Matt Gandenberger on bass, and Nick Baverman on drums, performed a rollicking nine-song set that left the audience in a great mood.

As I waited for Candlebox to take the stage, I thought about the last time I saw them. It was 1995, and they were at the peak of their popularity, right after the release of their sophomore album, “Lucy.” Their sound was fresh, and their performance was electrifying. After 23 years, a six-year hiatus and a few member changes, I wondered how they would sound. Would Kevin Martin’s distinct vocals still be strong? Would their music still be edgy and fresh?

The answer was a resounding, ”YES!”

They came out swinging with “Don’t You,” a high-energy hit from their self-titled debut album, which happens to be 25 years old now. They followed it up with “Change,” also from their debut album. I was relieved that founding member Kevin Martin’s distinct vocals were as strong as ever, and maybe even a little better – more mellow and less raspy than in Candlebox’s heyday. He did a fantastic job of engaging the crowd, making constant eye contact, giving high-fives, telling personal stories, repeatedly expressing appreciation for their loyalty, and explaining the meaning behind many of the songs. I found his “HAS BEEN” t-shirt hysterically ironic given the amount of energy he put into the show, as well as the fan love that was bestowed upon him.

That love was shared by Brian Quinn and Island Styles on guitar, Adam Kury on bass, and Rock-and-Roll-Hall-of-Famer Dave Krusen on drums. Although Martin is the only member who’s been with the band from the beginning, they played Candlebox’s syncopated riffs as though they’ve all been together for years. They jammed hard during their sixteen-song set, which included newer releases as well as older hits, along with some deeper cuts from their six studio albums, and extended versions of several songs. Nearly every song had at least a few people singing along, and I’m pretty sure 100% of the audience (including yours truly) was singing to the chorus of “You,” “Cover Me,” and “Far Behind.”

I was a little confused when the Martin took a survey near the end of the show to find out who all in the audience was Christian, then who was Catholic and who was Protestant. But then he explained that he doesn’t care what religion everyone is, and that we all need to respect each other’s beliefs and get along together. I normally hate when artists get political in their shows, but this is one message I can get behind. He then picked up an acoustic guitar for “Cover Me,” bringing an entirely different vibe and meaning to one of their biggest hits.

Candlebox finished their regular set with an intense and passionate version of “Far Behind,” which left everyone clamoring for “one more song.” The encore selection, “Rain,” started out slow and bluesy and ended with an all-out jam, which was a perfect ending to an amazing evening of rock and roll.

Bush, Stone Temple Pilots, and The Cult at Ruoff Home Mortgage Music Center - July 19, 2018


Live Review: Bush, Stone Temple Pilots, The Cult at Ruoff Home Mortgage Music Center

By Laura Fox

Torrential rains, extreme heat, and gusty winds didn’t dampen the spirits of concertgoers at Ruoff Home Mortgage Music Center Friday, July 19. Clad in plastic ponchos, garbage bags, or just their soggy clothes, they soaked up a great night of rock and roll as the Revolution 3 tour rolled through town. LA-based Julien K were the first to take the stage, getting the crowd warmed up with their edgy, electro-rock sound.

Post-punk/metal giants The Cult were up next. Somewhat ironically, the heaviest downpour of the night was during their second song, “Rain.” At the end of the song, however, an announcer came on stage and told everyone in the lawn to come down and sit in open sections of the pavilion; he didn’t have to ask twice!

Stone Temple Pilots started their set with their mega-hit, “Wicked Garden.” Frontman Jeff Gutt, who joined the group in 2017, nailed the rock star role, performing with great energy and passion, along with an in-your-face attitude and tons of crowd interaction.

Veteran band members Dean DeLeo on guitar, Robert DeLeo on bass and Eric Kretz on percussion also showed the fans lots of love. With the exception of “Meadow,” and “Roll Me Away” from their latest studio album, “Stone Temple Pilots” the band stuck to classic hits from their older albums, ending with another huge single, “Sex-Type Thing.”

Bush’s set started dramatically, with percussionist Robin Goodridge silhouetted behind his drumset, sticks raised. Then the first iconic riff of “Machinehead” rang out from the darkness, and lead singer/guitarist Gavin Rossdale leaped onto the stage. The crowd went nuts, lunging to their feet and shouting wildly.

The commotion never really died down as Bush powered through their biggest hits, plus an amazing cover of the Beatles’ “Come Together.” Rossdale, along with Chris Traynor on guitar and Corey Britz on bass, made constant eye contact with the audience, which they ate up. Rossdale, in particular, was in constant motion, pacing from front to back and side to side throughout the set.

By the time Bush closed their set with “Comedown,” the temperature had also come down. The rain had also stopped, leaving concertgoers basking in the echoes of the heavy-hitting show they had just experienced.

Bush


Stone Temple Pilots


The Cult

Vesperteen at 416 Wabash, 04/03/18

Despite having a broken foot, Vesperteen (A.K.A. Colin Rigsby) sang, drummed, stomped and danced his heart out at 416 Wabash in Indianapolis. Rigsby was accompanied by bassist Michael Bare of The New Schematics and keyboardist Michael Michael Cronin.